More Yellowstone Natural Wonders

Yellowstone’s natural wonders are a must-see, including geysers, hot springs, wildlife, waterfalls, and much more.

Calcite Springs. Photo by Gloria Wadzinski

Basalt Columns like “Rock Fence Posts” in Yellowstone

See massive rock columns that look like fence posts. They were formed by lava flow 1.3 million years ago. The rock columns can be found at Calcite Springs near Tower, and at Sheepeater Cliff. Read More...

Petrified Tree

How Yellowstone’s Petrified Forests Were Created

Large “petrified forests” or fossil forests cover much of the Yellowstone National Park’s northern portion. Read More...

Nature Valley TrailView

Nature Valley Trail View

Nature Valley brings national parks into homes across the world via new interactive website. The site offers 360-degree views of 300+ miles in Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, and Smoky Mountain National Parks. Read More...

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Nature Valley Trail View Slideshow

Slideshow of images captured during the crew’s two-week stay in Yellowstone. Read More...

Yellowstone's Natural Bridge in the Bridge Bay Area. Photo by Greg Willis [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

See a Natural Bridge or Arch

Visitors to the Yellowstone region can see a natural bridge or arch in a few places. Read More...

Mystic Falls in Yellowstone

The Sounds of Yellowstone

Natural sounds are especially important to preserve with the ever-encroaching impact of manmade “intrusions. A new website features roughly 30 sounds. Read More...

Seismic Monitor from iris.edu

Yellowstone Earthquake Seismic and GPS Monitoring

Seismic and GPS Monitoring Realtime earthquake information from the Yellowstone Seismic Network Read More...

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Yellowstone Top of Seven Natural Wonders of North America

Yellowstone National Park was the most recognized winner, getting both the most votes and the most number one votes. Read More...

Petrified Forest

Yellowstone’s Petrified Forest

Around 50 million years ago, scientists say this area of the park was flourishing with tall redwood trees, maples, magnolias, oaks, dogwoods, and pines when volcanic eruptions from the nearby Absaroka Mountain range buried the forest in ash. Read More...