Yellowstone Bear Injures Hikers

Two hikers who encountered a bear in the Yellowstone backcountry Thursday were treated and released for injuries. The small group of hikers–four in all–were hiking the Cygnet Lakes Trail southwest of Canyon Village where they were charged by a sow.
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Two hikers who encountered a bear in the Yellowstone backcountry Thursday were treated and released for injuries. The small group of hikers, four in all, were hiking the Cygnet Lakes Trail southwest of Canyon Village where they were charged by a sow.

The hikers saw a grizzly cub approaching the trail around 11:30 Thursday morning, followed closely by the appearance of the cub’s mother at very close range. The sow then charged the group.

Canisters of bear spray were immediately released by two of the hikers which caused the grizzly sow and cub to turn away after their minute-long encounter.

The group, who asked that their identities not be released, was able to hike out to the trailhead unassisted where one hiker was treated for injuries at the scene, and another was taken to a local hospital for additional treatment. The event is under investigation and this is the first report of bear-caused injuries in Yellowstone this year.

Park officials have temporarily closed the Cygnet Lakes Trail, Mary Mountain area, and additional areas around the trail as a precaution.

Knowing how to react upon encountering a bear in the backcountry can save your life. Learn more about what to do if you see a bear in Yellowstone by reading about Precautions in Bear Country.

http://yellowstone.net/blog/yellowstone-bear-encounter-two-hikers-injured/

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