Yellowstone in February Photo Gallery by Dave Shumway

Author:
Publish date:

February is a cold month in Yellowstone, filled with snow and ice, but it is a beautiful time. Photographers visiting Yellowstone in these cold months should pay close attention to how light is moving across the landscapes of Yellowstone.

Copyright Dave Shumway

Light plays across mountains to the North of Yellowstone National Park as the wind kicks off snow from the summit. Captured with a Canon 7D and 70-200/2.8L IS II in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of - 2/3 at ISO200, f/7.1, and 1/2500th of a second. The camera was resting on a beanbag.

Copyright Dave Shumway

Light, Snow and Trees align on a mountainside above Round Prairie in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon 7D and 500/4.0L IS in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of - 4/3 at ISO400, f/4.0, and 1/8000th of a second. The camera was resting on a beanbag.

Copyright Dave Shumway

Light plays across drifting snow above the Blacktail Lakes in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon 5D II and 70-200/2.8L IS II in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of 0 at ISO200, f/11, and 1/800th of a second. The camera was handheld.

February is mating season for wolves…that means that wolves are on the move and many find, that with the increased movement, that wolves are easier to see. Ad to it the ease of spotting of wolves on clean white snow, and you have a great month to see, and if you are lucky, photograph wolves.

Copyright Dave Shumway

The Lamar Canyon Wolf Pack celebrates a sunrise reunion in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon 7D and 500/4.0L IS in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of + 4/3 at ISO800, f/4.0, and 1/640th of a second. The camera was resting on a beanbag.

Copyright Dave Shumway

A five year old male Wolf from the Blacktail Pack howls at the rest of his family. Captured with a Canon 7D and 500/4.0L IS + 1.4TC III in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of + 5/3 at ISO800, f/7.1, and 1/1600th of a second. The camera was mounted on a Gitzo 3540XLS and Induro GHB2 gimbal head with a custom long lens support.

Sub zero temperatures and water equals ice. If you take the time to search the banks of Yellowstone’s rivers you will likely find magical scenes of rocks, snow and ice…when you mix in moving water with long exposures. Get out, be safe, and have fun.

Copyright Dave Shumway

Water races along the snow and ice covered boulders that dot Soda Butte Creek in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon 5D II and 70-200/2.8L IS II in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of + 4/3 at ISO50, f/16, and .6 seconds. The camera was mounted on an Induro CT214 tripod and Acratech GP 1 ball head, a 4 stop neutral density filer was used to allow a longer exposure and a Singh-Ray LB Polarizer was used to cut the reflection from the water.

Copyright Dave Shumway

Water races along the snow and ice covered boulders that dot Soda Butte Creek in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon 5D II and 70-200/2.8L IS II in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of + 4/3 at ISO50, f/16, and .8 seconds. The camera was mounted on an Induro CT214 tripod and Acratech GP 1 ball head, a 4 stop neutral density filer was used to allow a longer exposure and a Singh-Ray LB Polarizer was used to cut the reflection from the water.

Winter causes a change in Yellowstone’s wildlife, their coats fill out to handle the extreme cold of the park, and that makes most of them look beautiful.

Copyright Dave Shumway

A Bighorn Sheep, ram, grazes far above the Yellowstone River in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon 5D II and 70-200/2.8L IS II + 2.0TC III in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of + 2/3 at ISO400, f/6.3, and 1/250th of a second. The camera was handheld.

Copyright Dave Shumway

A Coyote licks its chops in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon 7D and 70-200/2.8L IS II in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of + 1 at ISO400, f/4.0, and 1/200th of a second. The camera was handheld.

February is an extremely cold month in Yellowstone, but it also has few visitors, ample wildlife and a special kind of pure beauty.

Copyright Dave Shumway

A lone red fox walks in the snow on an 18° morning before the sun rises on Yellowstone National Park (near Tower Junction). Created with a Canon 5D II and a 70-200/2.8L IS II set in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of +1 2/3 to f/2.8, ISO 800, and 1/1000th of a second. Shot handheld during a roll by.

Copyright Dave Shumway

A yearling elk makes her way through deep snow while trying to feed in Yellowstone National Park (near Phantom Lake). Created with a Canon 5D II and a 70-200/2.8L IS II + 1.4TC III set in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of +1 2/3 to f/4.5, ISO 400, and 1/2500th of a second. Shot handheld during a roll by.

More Photo Galleries

Related

copyrighted geyser photo by Dave Shumway

Yellowstone in May Photo Gallery by Dave Shumway

In May, the crowds have not filled the park (yet) and all of the wildlife is starting to recover from winter’s extreme cold.

YS birds by Dave Shumway

Yellowstone in April Photo Gallery by Dave Shumway

April can be a mystery box of opportunities in Yellowstone, as it seems each year the snow levels and activity are completely differen

Dave Shumway January feature photo

Yellowstone in January Photo Gallery by Dave Shumway

Wolves are out and about, their prey is in the valley, so they too are within sight of the road that runs through the "Northern Valley."

December coyote by Dave Shumway

Yellowstone in December Photo Gallery by Dave Shumway

December… the crowds have left, the snow is accumulating and the animals know that they have a long cold winter ahead of them.

Yellowstone in October - Swan - Copyright Dave Shumway

Yellowstone in October Photo Gallery by Dave Shumway

October...Fall colors, elk rut, cool mornings, steam on the water, less visitors and (often) magical light.

copyrighted Yellowstone wolf photo by Dave Shumway

Yellowstone in March Photo Gallery by Dave Shumway

March… the month of the wolf. With winter loosening it grip for the first time the Park’s wildlife begins to come out including grizzlies.

Dave Shumway Fox in November

Yellowstone in November Photo Gallery by Dave Shumway

Photographs of early winter in Yellowstone National Park featuring wildlife, Lava Creek, Abiathar Peak, and Undine Falls.

Otter in Yellowstone. Photo by Dave Shumway

Yellowstone in July Photo Gallery by Dave Shumway

The secret to photographing Yellowstone in July is to know where the action is, hike there shortly after sunrise and spend the entire day there.

Sept Yellowstone trees by Dave Shumway

Yellowstone in September Photo Gallery by Dave Shumway

Fall brings about a boost to wildlife activity in the park. Most visitors come to see and photograph the elk and moose ruts.