Photos of Total Lunar Eclispe 2012 by Dave Schumway

Amazing photographs of a total lunar eclipse as seen over Yellowstone National Park in December 2012.
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0
Amazing photographs of a total lunar eclipse as seen over Yellowstone National Park in December 2012.

Clear cold nights are a great to photograph stars and the moon, especially when a clear night coincides with a total lunar eclipse. This December brought perfect weather to photograph the lunar eclipse. The weather was perfect for clean nights, ten degrees bellow zero (fahrenheit), so I planned a trip to spend three days skiing, camping and photographing inside Yellowstone, aligned with the total lunar eclipse. It all worked out to provide nice photographs, good skiing and an all-around great time in Yellowstone National Park.

 The shadow of Earth slowly creeps across the moon during a total lunar eclipse. Captured with a Canon 7D and 500/4.0L IS + 1.4TC III in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of - 2/3 at ISO200, f/9.0, and 1/100th of a second. The camera was mounted on a Gitzo 3540XLS tripod and Induro GBH2 head with a custom long lens support. A cable release and LiveView, as mirror lock up, was used.

The shadow of Earth slowly creeps across the moon during a total lunar eclipse. Captured with a Canon 7D and 500/4.0L IS + 1.4TC III in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of - 2/3 at ISO200, f/9.0, and 1/100th of a second. The camera was mounted on a Gitzo 3540XLS tripod and Induro GBH2 head with a custom long lens support. A cable release and LiveView, as mirror lock up, was used.

 The full moon rises through trees on a ridgeline in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon7D and 500/4.0L IS + 1.4TC III in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of - 4/3 at ISO200, f/11, and 1/160th of a second. The camera was resting on a beanbag.

The full moon rises through trees on a ridgeline in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon7D and 500/4.0L IS + 1.4TC III in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of - 4/3 at ISO200, f/11, and 1/160th of a second. The camera was resting on a beanbag.

 The moon turns blood red as it enters a full lunar eclipse, at the same time the sun rises casting its first light on Mount Everts in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon 5D II and 70-200/2.8L IS II in manual mode at ISO400, f/7.1, and 3.2 seconds. The camera was mounted on an Indur CT214 tripod and Acratech GP head. A cable release and LiveView, as mirror lock up, was used.

The moon turns blood red as it enters a full lunar eclipse, at the same time the sun rises casting its first light on Mount Everts in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon 5D II and 70-200/2.8L IS II in manual mode at ISO400, f/7.1, and 3.2 seconds. The camera was mounted on an Indur CT214 tripod and Acratech GP head. A cable release and LiveView, as mirror lock up, was used.

 Photographer Dave M. Shumway opens the door to his tent during a cold December night in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon 5DII and 17-40/4.0L in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of - 1/3 at ISO1600, f/5.6, and 13 seconds.The camera was mounted on an Induro A413 tripod and Induro BHD2 bullhead and a cable release was used.

Photographer Dave M. Shumway opens the door to his tent during a cold December night in Yellowstone National Park. Captured with a Canon 5DII and 17-40/4.0L in aperture priority mode with an exposure bias of - 1/3 at ISO1600, f/5.6, and 13 seconds.The camera was mounted on an Induro A413 tripod and Induro BHD2 bullhead and a cable release was used.

Dave M. Shumway is a professional photographer, director of communications for Volunteers of America and adjunct professor of photography at Rocky Mountain College. Currently based in Montana, Dave has two passions, one for the outdoors and one for photography. To this end, he averages 150 days/year in wild and fragile places the world over. Working as a photographer, Dave’s assignments include everything from wildlife and landscape photography to journalism and commercial work. His extensive time in the field shows through in online galleries, which are loaded with images of the fragile places to which he travels. His work can be viewed at www.DaveShumway.com.

Photographer Dave Shumway

Related