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National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson, Wyo.

Perched above the National Elk Refuge and two miles from the Grand Teton National Park entrance, the National Museum of Wildlife Art features more than 5,000 items of animal art. Here are six reasons to visit this national gem.

1. Chief by Robert Bateman

Robert Bateman (Canadian, b. 1930), Chief. 1997. Acrylic on Canvas. 71 x 98 inches. Gift of Birgit and Robert Bateman, National Museum of Wildlife Art
Robert Bateman (Canadian, b. 1930), Chief. 1997. Acrylic on Canvas. 71 x 98 inches. Gift of Birgit and Robert Bateman, National Museum of Wildlife Art

This is one of those paintings you must see if you visit. It’s a domineering painting of a bison by Robert Bateman that is both moody and beautiful. It’s one that captures a longtime resident of the area.

2. Palate Restaurant in the Museum

Enjoy lunch to match the views from Graeme and Christine Mara Swain who own Jackson’s popular Gather Restaurant. The restaurant’s interior is ultra modern with decor that matches the world-class views from the museum. “Our goal is to create an experience where the food, the view, and the art all come together to create a one-of-a-kind dining experience,” says Graeme Swain.

3. Wildlife Paintings from the Permanent Collection

Albert Bierstadt (German, 1830–1902), In the Forest, c. 1880. Oil on Canvas. 36 x 26 inches. JKM Collection®, National Museum of Wildlife Art.
Albert Bierstadt (German, 1830–1902), In the Forest, c. 1880. Oil on Canvas. 36 x 26 inches. JKM Collection®, National Museum of Wildlife Art.

The museum features more than 550 artists and has more than 5,000 cataloged items of animal art from 2500 b.c. to today. In the JKM Gallery, you’ll discover “Wildlife Paintings,” a thematic exhibit filled with wildlife paintings done by artists like Albert Bierstadt, Charles M. Russell, Georgia O’Keeffe, Alexander Pope and more.

4. Valued Species: Animals in the Art of Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei

Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987), Bighorn Ram, 1983. Screenprint. 38 x 38 inches. Gift of the 2006 Collectors Circle and an Anonymous Donor and the NMWA Acquisitions Fund, National Museum of Wildlife Art. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York.
Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987), Bighorn Ram, 1983. Screenprint. 38 x 38 inches. Gift of the 2006 Collectors Circle and an Anonymous Donor and the NMWA Acquisitions Fund, National Museum of Wildlife Art. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York/Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York.

June 5, 2021- Aug.29, 2021

See pop art legend Andy Warhol’s Endangered Species series that’s part of the museum’s permanent collection on display with Ai Weiwei’s  with Zodiac series (2018) where Chinese zodiac animal portraits are made from thousands of LEGO bricks. Together the two artists’ depiction of real and imaginary animals provoke questions as to how we value and make meaning of animals and art.

5. Yoga on the Trail

Yoga on the Trail
Courtesy National Museum of Wildlife Art

Visitors can participate in a free yoga class on the museum’s Sculpture Trail every Thursday. Check for hours when the museum opens. You may never do yoga in a more gorgeous setting, so don’t miss this opportunity to be outside overlooking the National Elk Refuge.

6. State of the Art: Student Art Show

Through May 9, 2021

See the creativity of local youth in 300 works by K-12 students in this collaboration between the museum and art educators in Teton County. View the exhibit PDF download.


For more information:
(800) 313-9553, (307) 733-5771
2820 Rungius Road, Jackson, Wyoming 83001
wildlifeart.org