See bears at the Grizzly & Wolf Discovery Center - My Yellowstone Park

Grizzly & Wolf Discovery Center

Complete your vacation to Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks by visiting the not-for-profit Grizzly & Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone, Montana. Observe live bears and wolves in naturalistic habitats.
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West Yellowstone Grizzly & Wolf Discovery Center. Photo by John Williams.

West Yellowstone Grizzly & Bear Center. Photo by John Williams.

(406) 646-7001 grizzlydiscoveryctr.org

Complete your vacation to Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks by visiting the Grizzly & Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone, Montana. Observe live bears and wolves in naturalistic habitats. The Center is a not-for-profit wildlife park and educational facility that promises a unique experience you won’t soon forget.

Grizzly's That Can't Live in the Wild

Grizzly bears that live at the GWDC are animals that were unable to survive in the wild for various reasons. Many were orphaned when their mothers became accustomed to obtaining food from human areas. Others had been labeled “nuisance bears” because they were becoming dangerously comfortable around humans. These animals have a second chance at the Center. Their stories help share important lessons about living and recreating in bear country.

West Yellowstone Grizzly & Bear Center. Photo by John Williams.

West Yellowstone Grizzly & Bear Center. Photo by John Williams.

Captive-Born Wolves

The wolves were all captive-born. The GWDC agreed to take pups from different litters, and have since formed two wolf packs. Wolves possess a dynamic and strong family structure that can be observed as these animals interact through their day. Watch for body posturing, ear and tail position, and each animal’s location in the habitat.

Educational Programs

The Center’s main goal is to help guests gain knowledge about grizzly bears and wolves through educational programs. Not only can visitors spend time watching these magnificent animals interact in their outdoor habitats, they can also take advantage of a wide variety of programs and activities made available for the whole family. In Keeper Kids, children ages 5 to 12 learn what bears eat and help the naturalists hide food for the bears.

In Bird-of-Prey demonstrators, visitors see non-releasable raptors up close. Two programs—Safety in Bear Country and Living with Bears—teach how wildlife pros manage bruins with the help of a live Karelian bear dog.

Visit the Naturalist Cabin to see two separate wolf packs through floor-to-ceiling windows. Highlights in the cabin include daily “Pack Chats,” a National Geographic film on wolves, and a life-sized wolf model.

The center is open 365 days a year (GWDC bears do not hibernate). Admission is good for two consecutive days.

Wherever your travels take you, it’s worth the trip to discover and explore at the Grizzly & Wolf Discovery Center.

More Information:
One block from the west entrance to Yellowstone National Park
201 South Canyon, West Yellowstone, Montana
(406) 646-7001
grizzlydiscoveryctr.org

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